Accents Asia Journal of the Teachers College Columbia University Japan Alumni Association
Accents AsiaJournal of the Teachers College Columbia University Japan Alumni Association

Current Issue: Volume 10 Issue 1, June 2018

Some Controversies to Ponder over in ESL Writing Feedback 

Aytaged Sisay Zeleke, Delaware Technical Community College, USA

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ABSTRACT

Feedback is one of the most important activities in any English as a Second Language (ESL) writing class, and many teachers and students believe that it is key for writing development. The aim of this paper is to analyze research and come to an understanding of the effectiveness of corrective feedback in enhancing the quality of ESL students’ writing. To this end, the following paper presents a critical review of published empirical studies in the area. The review illustrates that feedback in ESL writing has both advantages and disadvantages, with mixed empirical findings suggesting controversy about its effectiveness. The review concludes by highlighting the need for continuing research in the area.

 

The Motivational Self System, Five-factor Model, and Proficiency in Japanese University Sudents 

Steven G. B. MacWhinnie, Aomori Chuo Gakuin University, Japan

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ABSTRACT

Research has shown that motivation is intimately connected to language proficiency (Dörnyei, 1994), yet little has been done to show how personality might be connected to both personality and proficiency in Japanese undergraduate students. This study examined the connection between the five-factor model of personality traits and the second language (L2) motivational self system, and how both constructs relate to self-perceived proficiency. Participants completed the Ten Item Personality Inventory in Japanese (TIPI-J) along with a measure of the L2 motivational self system. Students from two Japanese universities took part in this study (N = 228). The results showed that extroversion and openness correlated with the L2 motivational self system, while conscientiousness and openness correlated with perceived proficiency.

 

Examining the Role of Model Texts in Writing Instruction 

John Peloghitis and Dan Ferreira, International Christian University, Japan

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ABSTRACT

Model texts are a common tool writing teachers utilize to assist students in tackling new, unfamiliar genres. Model texts provide a concrete example for learners to understand what is to be expected as a finished product and to process the rhetorical structures, conventions, and organizational features within the text. By noticing and developing an awareness of rhetorical modes, L2 learners can eventually apply their knowledge more creatively in future writing tasks. The following paper reviews the existing literature concerning the effectiveness and application of model texts in writing. An overview of the advantages and disadvantages in how model texts are implemented˛ highlights some of the pertinent issues related to the teaching and learning practices. Lastly, although scholars have generally advocated the use of models in the literature and have been applied in empirical studies, little has been written which specifically addresses the practical needs of teachers. Thus, this paper offers instructors several guidelines to consider when incorporating model texts into the writing process. 

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Accents Asia = ISSN 1948-3503