Accents Asia Journal of the Teachers College Columbia University Japan Alumni Association
Accents AsiaJournal of the Teachers College Columbia University Japan Alumni Association

Current Issue: Volume 9 Issue 2, December 2017

JALT Yokohama Special Issue: “Tech@Tamagawa” 

Forward to the Special Issue

Brett Milliner & Travis Cote, Tamagawa University, Japan

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Five Online Resources for Extensive Listening in the Japanese EFL Classroom 

Brett Milliner, Tamagawa University, Japan

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ABSTRACT

To promote listening fluency and autonomous language learning, lower-intermediate Japanese students were asked to self-select and listen to six listening texts online for homework each week. After each listening, students completed a short listening log to summarise what they listened to and reflect on their listening experience. This paper will introduce the five websites most regularly used by students during the 15-week course. The author hopes that this paper’s theoretical discussion and selection of websites will assist EFL teachers in discerning which online resources would be more appropriate for implementing extensive listening components in their own EFL courses.

 

The Positive Influence of Skype Exchanges on Japanese Elementary Students’ Affect

David Ockert, Toyo University, Japan

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ABSTRACT

The pre-post survey results of a pilot / exploratory study of elementary school students in Japan, who engaged in three Skype exchanges with English speakers in Australia, are reported. There are statistically significant increases in Foreign Language Activities (p < .01), International Posture (p < .01), and Motivation toward studying EFL (p < .01), and their Desire to Travel Overseas (p < .05). In addition, the Glass’ delta effect size (Cohen, 1992) measures are: for Foreign Language Activities = 0.83; International Posture =1.06; Motivation to study EFL= 0.80; and Desire to Travel Overseas = 0.54. These results demonstrate the statistically significant increases are also meaningful. The results for statistical power show the level of the probability that the experiment would yield similar results if repeated (Soper, 2016). The Foreign Language Activities result is .77; International Posture is .95, the Motivation’s level is .74, and Desire to Travel Overseas has a .65 level of statistical probability. The effect size results demonstrate the statistically significant increases are meaningful; statistical power results show the probability that the experiment would yield similar results if repeated. These results and the correlations are discussed regarding a future partial least squares regression and structural equation model analysis

 

Using Reflective Logs to Track Independent Work

Malcolm Prentice, Soka University, World Language Centre, Japan

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ABSTRACT

This article describes a small Action Research project which looked at the use of reflective statements, submitted online through Google Forms, to track independent reading and listening work done for homework in three introductory English for Academic Purposes (EAP) courses. After accessing the materials (such as graded readers and news articles), students were provided with example narrative frames and asked to submit responses to what they had read (e.g. “After reading this, I realised...”, “This lecture made me want to...”, “My favourite quote was ... because ....”). Analysis of submissions showed that requiring these reflective statements did not deter students from choosing to do additional reading/listening work, but that only a third of statements were of a quality which allowed confidence that students had in fact accessed the materials. Some suggestions are made for how the process can be improved in the future. 

 

Producing Online Quizzes Efficiently with Google Apps

Paul McKenna, Tamagawa University, Japan

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ABSTRACT

Technology allows teachers to automate some monotonous administrative tasks such as marking and grading quizzes, etc., freeing up time for the teacher to do more interesting and effective work. However, setting up these quizzes online can be tedious and time-consuming. This paper, which follows from a presentation for Yokohama JALT Tech Myshare delivered on January 22, 2017 (https://goo.gl/tUe5MV), describes an efficient way of producing online quizzes from textbooks using a range of Google applications and add-ons. 

 

Apps 4 EFL: Web-based Language Learning with Creative Commons Data

Paul Raine, J. F. Oberlin University, Japan

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ABSTRACT

Apps 4 EFL (www.apps4efl.com) is a Web Based Language Learning (WBLL) platform wholly developed by the author. It uses Creative Commons Data in conjunction with open web technologies to deliver engaging and effective English language learning activities. This paper discusses the types of data utilized by Apps 4 EFL, and gives details about some of the pedagogical activities Apps 4 EFL provides, along with existing research that backs up the effectiveness of such activities. The results of a survey administered to Japanese university students (n=84) are also presented and evaluated. The respondents used the Apps 4 EFL platform for one semester (15 weeks), and the survey was administered at the end of the semester. The respondents used the site to study vocabulary and grammar constructions which related to the content of their respective courses. The results of the survey, along with existing research, suggest that Apps 4 EFL’s activities are effective, enjoyable, and convenient ways for learners to improve their English language abilities.

 

Tech for the Modern EFL Student: Collaborate and Motivate with Padlet

Selinda England, Tokai University, Japan

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ABSTRACT

Contemporary students are connected to the Internet and thrive on high visual stimulation. Padlet is an online application which replicates the feeling of a virtual bulletin board for sharing ideas, videos, web-based text, and more. Educators have turned Padlet into an online space for posting project information, mind-mapping, or displaying supplementary materials for access outside of the learning environment. This article will introduce and examine support for the use of Padlet in education, briefly explain how to use Padlet, and offer practical applications for those in English-as-a-second/English-as-a-foreign-language (ESL/EFL) learning settings.

 

Applying NHK Programs for Learning Outside the Classroom

Yumi Matsumoto, Tamagawa University and University of the Sacred Heart, Japan

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ABSTRACT

Contemporary students are connected to the Internet and thrive on high visual stimulation. Padlet is an online application which replicates the feeling of a virtual bulletin board for sharing ideas, videos, web-based text, and more. Educators have turned Padlet into an online space for posting project information, mind-mapping, or displaying supplementary materials for access outside of the learning environment. This article will introduce and examine support for the use of Padlet in education, briefly explain how to use Padlet, and offer practical applications for those in English-as-a-second/English-as-a-foreign-language (ESL/EFL) learning settings.

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